Educator e collar: ‘It’s the perfect solution’

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Educator E collar has been awarded the first patent for a ‘smart collar’ which can identify pupils with autism, by a judge at the European Patent Office.

The device has been developed by a team at the University of Birmingham.

A device called the Educatore collar, which has been named after the British television presenter, was awarded a patent in the US last week, by US judge Barbara Loomis.

The Educator, or EducatorE, has an infrared camera that measures pupils’ movements, and can then track their behaviour with an app.

It was invented by a group of researchers in Birmingham, including Prof Alan Jones.

“It is the perfect way to recognise a child with autism,” said Professor Jones.

The team of researchers from the University’s Department of Psychology have created a sensor-based system to analyse the pupils’ movement in order to identify which ones have autism.

The system can recognise pupils with disabilities in the same way as a person with autism would.

This means it can track pupils with speech problems and their speech, and even those with language problems.

The sensors could also be used to identify children with speech disorders, which could potentially lead to a quicker diagnosis of the condition.

The pupils’ position can be identified using an external microphone and the device can also recognise facial expressions.

Prof Jones believes the device could be used by teachers and medical staff who need to make sure pupils are receiving appropriate help. “

This technology has potential to help people who have difficulties in speaking and who have difficulty reading.”

Prof Jones believes the device could be used by teachers and medical staff who need to make sure pupils are receiving appropriate help.

“I think it would be an ideal way of improving the way we educate children and their parents and I think it will be very beneficial in the long run.”

The device, which was first tested in 2012, uses infrared cameras to capture pupil movements.

The images are sent back to the parent or carer via a smartphone app.

The pupil can be seen as a bar graph that changes colour depending on whether the pupil is moving or not.

“If a pupil is looking at the bar graph, we are looking at a change in colour from red to blue,” said Prof Jones.

He said the technology could be particularly useful for people with disabilities who have limited movement ability.

“You can actually tell if they have limited range of movement, for example people with visual impairments,” he said.

“That’s the key to it.

Prof Andrew Dyer, Professor of Psychology at the Birmingham School of Medicine, said the invention would help with the diagnosis of autistic children. “

So you can look at that pupil and you can see if they are in a different range of range of motion.”

Prof Andrew Dyer, Professor of Psychology at the Birmingham School of Medicine, said the invention would help with the diagnosis of autistic children.

“In autism, the pupils movements and movements of other pupils is very important,” he explained.

“A child with a speech disability, for instance, would be able to use speech cues to communicate and understand the meaning of certain phrases.”

Prof Dyer said the device was currently in a prototype stage and would need to be developed further to ensure it could be rolled out to schools.

The technology is currently used in classrooms in Birmingham and around the country.

The InnovatorE is currently being tested in schools.

A similar device has already been developed in Sweden.

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